Basic Requirements for a Thesis Statement

"BRAVE"   (Pictured) MERIDA. ©2012 Disney/Pixar. All Rights Reserved. "BRAVE" (Pictured) MERIDA. ©2012 Disney/Pixar. All Rights Reserved.
Brave (Pixar's animated feature film 2012)
Brave (Pixar’s animated feature film 2012)

In “Simon & Schuster Handbook for Writers” (2009) Troyka and Hesse highlight four basic requirements for a thesis statement: 1) It states the essay’s subject – the topic that you discuss. 2) It conveys the essay’s purpose – either informative or persuasive. 3) It indicates your focus – the assertion that presents your point of view. 4) It briefly states the major subdivisions of the essay’s topic.

In light of the information above, please comment on these statements:

Featuring Miranda as a strong female lead, Pixar’s “Brave” challenges traditional gender roles in animated films.

Ben Affleck’s “Argo” is an accomplished film with regard to its ability to create tension, its use of settings and dramatization of CIA’s rescue of Americans in Iran. However, the film’s patriotic narrative seems to be problematic.

Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho” well demonstrates the two aesthetic influences in the director’s style: German impressionism and Soviet montage theory.

Austrian director Haneke’s “Funny Games” disturbs its audience through the depiction of violence in the contemporary world.

In George Orwell’s “Nineteen Eighty-Four”, Big Brother manages to control people’s mind by using media as a tool for propaganda and by creating Thought Police.

Alice Walker’s “The Color Purple” can be interpreted both as an informative and a guiding text because it demonstrates how a patriarchy and racial segregation victimize an African-American woman called Celie and then shows what she needs to do overcome these obstacles.

An in-depth analysis of the use of locations, dialogues and lighting in “Three Monkeys” can reveal Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s minimalist approach.